Policin’ Aint Easy

Mob Safety: How To Survive Encounters With ANTIFA

By Steve Claggett May 24, 2021
You and your family are visiting relatives in the city.  You’ve agreed to meet them at a highly touted bistro downtown.  Suddenly, a throng of dark clad figures with skateboards and backpacks envelop your vehicle.  They begin to rock your car while screaming incoherent chants.  The drivers’ window explodes showering you and your family with glass. 

 

 

You are trapped by the mob.  

Unless you’re a stoned out rock star or a “has been” soap diva, this is probably an encounter you’d want to avoid.

 

How do angry misguided mobs burn and loot entire sections of cities with no repercussions?

 

How do they victimize businesses and individuals while claiming victim status for themselves? 

 

I have resigned myself to the fact that this trend will continue until enough people suffer from the insanity, and society finally takes a stand.

 

Instead, I focus on how I can prepare for the insanity plaguing so many areas of our country.  I’m hoping this will stimulate a mindset you can share with your loved ones. 

 

Understanding the Mob

We first have to understand the mob mentality and what makes tick.  

Anonymity and heightened emotional states are two key factors in the violent mob.  Trained activists can easily manipulate them into frenzy.  Because of these factors irrational actions of violence can be expected.  

 

Your Ultimate Goal 

Our ultimate goal in any danger situation is awareness and avoidance.  If you can see it early enough you can avoid it.  Situational awareness is an “active” skill that must be practiced.  

 

It first requires scanning your surroundings (easy enough).  It calls for delaying the record-setting attempt on Candy Crush or the killer selfie for your adoring followers, but self-preservation is not a priority on everybody’s “to do” list. 

 

Secondly, recognizing something out of place or unusual to the environment.  The long coat on a hot day, the empty running car outside a business, the crowd running past you, are all indicators of potential danger.   

 

 

Stay sharp.  Seek safety.

  

Three Scenarios

We’ll discuss three separate incidents of potential aggressive crowd (mob) behavior and what to consider in each.  

  • In your vehicle
  • Pedestrian on the street 
  • Patron of a Business (restaurant, store, theater, etc.)

 

Under all three situations, if you cannot avoid the incident, the standard for taking action is force to avoid injury and deadly force to avoid reasonable fear of death or serious bodily injury to you or a third person (ie: family member or friend).  I strongly suggest you refer to your state laws to determine what your response can be for various threat levels.  

 

Mob vs. Vehicle

Personal defense inside a vehicle has challenges and options the other two don’t have.  Driving away may be more difficult than running away depending on the crowd, but the vehicle itself may be considered a weapon if the action is required.

 

Obviously, a firearm is recommended for personal protection in any situation even mob aggression if the above threshold is met.  It is more surgical than a vehicle and in some cases, the mere presentation of a weapon is enough to dissuade a normal aggressor.  Keep this in mind:  if you present a weapon you must be willing (and trained) to use it.  

 

It’s easy to secrete OC spray, knives, stun guns, and an array of impact weapons in your car, but they must first be accessible.

 

A general standard when surrounded by a violent mob around your car is:  don’t get out and don’t be pulled out.  

 

Mob vs. Pedestrian

As a pedestrian, if you are the target of a violent mob I would recommend the active shooter response- run, hide, fight.    

 

Avoid or escape the threat.  This will depend on the aggression of the crowd and the environment you are in.  Avoid being cornered if possible.  

 

If you cannot avoid or escape, hiding is your second option.  This can include climbing under a car or into a dumpster or merely blending into the crowd.  

 

Fight is the final option.  I would recommend a firearm for your personal protection with the same caveat mentioned in the vehicle scenario.  If you don’t have a firearm consider improvised weapons:  your belt and buckle, a rock, a garbage can lid, or anything you can tear off something else.  

 

If nothing else put yourself in a “defensible position”.  In past articles we have talked about tactical guys keeping their battlefields in front of them and no more than 180 degrees.  The same principle applies.  If they can get behind you, they can ambush you.  Most important rule:  rules don’t apply.  (See Kyle Rittenhouse).

 

Mob vs. Patrons in a Business

 We’ve all seen the videos of the thugs pouring into business establishments to harass patrons.  When physical harm is threatened or contact occurs a threshold has been passed.  

 

If more serious intentions are obvious, I would suggest the run, hide, fight strategy.  

There exists a tenuous balance between what is worth fighting for and what is not.  

I will never tell anyone when they should pull the trigger, just as I will never assume I know what’s best for them and their loved ones during a stressful scenario.

 

With businesses you usually have a back or side doors for escape.  If escape is not an option and hiding spaces are limited, improvised weapons are plentiful in most businesses, especially restaurants.  

 

More than likely you will not be the only victim.  Under stress two things are very contagious: Panic and Composure.  You are more likely to enlist battle buddies from the other victims with a composed demeanor rather than a panic demeanor. 

 

This is the first step in taking our country back.  A fearful nation is no longer an independent nation. Be prepared for those that mean us harm.

 

Who is Steve Claggett? Good question. Here’s a decent answer.

 

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